Sunday, October 2, 2005

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<font face="arial"><a href="http://www.ladyinterference.com/assorteds/quiz.html" target="_blank">what decade does your personality live in?</a><br><br>
quiz brought to you by <a href="http://www.ladyinterference.com/" target="_blank">lady interference, ltd</a></font>
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Sunday afternoon...not doing much today.  Church this morning, a bit of laundry, grocery shopping later...fun, fun.  I took this personality quiz found in the Saturday Six.  There never seems to be enough time to answer all the questions, but I was interested in finding out what decade I related most to.  Being an 80's woman doesn't surprise me.  I was in high school then, and even though those days seemed very depressing to me at the time, I look back and remember a lot of good experiences as well.  Quite frankly, I'm lucky to be here today writing this...I allowed myself to fall deeply into the adolescent hole of self pity, but I had a lot of friends down there with me.  I'm sure many of you had similar teenage years.  I was a middle girl.  I had friends who were cheerleaders and football players and also friends who were thought of as outcasts.  It seems so funny to me now...we actually had an outdoor smoking room for students!  Of course no one used it except the "losers" even though the popular kids smoked behind their closet doors!  When I flunked out of freshman year, dyed my hair black and looked like I just moved into town straight from a punk rock video, I lost quite a few friends...and gained some new ones that mom and dad looked at crosseyed from behind the flowered curtain of our very normal home.  So many things happened back then.  I won't get into them all.  Maybe in another entry.  Like I said, I'm lucky to be here.  I'm thankful every day.

I finally turned myself back around in '87, knowing I had to shape up or be a failure forever.  I had to go to summer school for the second summer in a row to graduate with my class.  I did, and I even looked "normal" again, too.  Much to the delight of my parents, who really put up with so much crap from me.  I never really appreciated them until about 2 years later, but I wasn't so difficult to be around anymore.  I still am shocked that I graduated with my class...or at all.

Part of the reason I do what I do for work is to help kids get a positive start to school and to help them build healthy relationships with other kids.  I think this is so important at an early age, to get that extra help when you need it.  Teachers do an amazing job, educating 16+ students every day for 7 hours...my job is to help meet the needs of those who feel lost or who don't believe in themselves.  I want them to feel positive about school at an early age and have them know that they are okay, and help is available. 

I believe my difficult experiences during the 80's shaped my into the adult I am today.  I didn't cry in vain.  I hope I can always realize my purpose on this earth as a mother, a wife, a daughter and a teacher, and never forget that I am okay, too.  :o)

3 comments:

stacy1tbkl said...

I, too, was a 80's girl....(from the quiz)
I graduated in the 80s and thought it was a crazy era at the time, now it all seems so darned.....subdued by todays standards.  Cindy Lauper was singing "SHE BOP" and although I didn't "get" the meaning at the time, it was only IMPLIED and not stated in todays terms which are HIGHLY graphic and SEXUAL.

WE all live and learn.

Stace

cdittric77 said...

Great entry, and even more so, we're never given more than we can deal with!
Peace and love,
Charley
http://journals.aol.com/CDittric77/Courage

justaname4me2 said...

80's and teenagehood. That was me. Drugs, parties, skipping and getting kicked out of school and that list could go on and ON. I too am grateful I made it out alive. Regrettably I can't even say I have many good memories. But, I did turn around and remember many of the lessons learned.
Rebecca